copyright

Grand Rights

When you play or sing or programme a work that is in copyright, you need to consider who licenses the right to perform it. If you’re performing a piece of music as part of a standard concert/recital/gig, that’s usually simple – the vast majority of pieces can be licensed through PRS for Music (read all about PRS fees in our guidance).

How and where to source music

This guidance is aimed at providing all the information you need to act as your group's librarian - from sourcing music to dealing with copyright.

PRS video guides (part 1): What are PRS fees?

Part 1 of our two-part video series on Performing Rights Fees (PRS): what they are and whether you need to pay them.
 

 

 

Watch Part 2: Paying PRS fees

Performing Rights (PRS) FAQs

If you are putting on a public performance of music you may have to pay royalty fees. It is important that you understand what you obligations are and that you are paying any fees where necessary.

Copyright, licensing and permissions - Part 1: What is copyright?

When your group decides to perform a piece of music there will be copyright laws, permissions and licenses to be aware of. Part 1 of our guidance gives an introduction to music copyright.

Contents:

Copyright, licensing and permissions - Part 2: Obtaining music

When your group decides to perform a piece of music there will be copyright laws, permissions and licenses to be aware of. Part 2 of our guidance looks at the first stage of this process – obtaining the sheet music.  

There are three different copyrights to be aware of for a piece of music:

Copyright, licensing and permissions - Part 5: Recording and distributing music

When your group decides to perform a piece of music there will be copyright laws, permissions and licenses to be aware of. Part 5 of our guidance looks at how that applies to making and using a recording of the music you perform. 

There are three different copyrights to be aware of for a piece of music.