recruitment

Perform at one of 10 major railway stations next March for Give a Gig

Give a Gig is Youth Music’s flagship fundraising initiative, taking place from 16-25 March 2018. 

A teenager's 6 top tips for engaging with young members

As a young musician and member of ensembles and orchestras there are certain things which I enjoy and others which I don’t and ca

Recruiting young members: where to find them!

Our research into engaging under 35 year olds in music groups pointed to a need for better outreach and publicity. Young people might not be specifically looking for a group to join, or might not be aware of groups in their area. So instead of waiting for them to find you, go to where they are! But where might they be? Here are a few ideas to get you started.

1. Go to local businesses and offices

Most offices will have a fair number of under 35s amongst their staff. Try the following:

The millennial gap: Tips for recruiting younger members

Struggling to recruit younger members? In this guidance, reprinted from the Autumn 2016 issue of Highnotes, Making Music’s Youth Engagement Manager Xenia Davis has some suggestions.

The biggest barrier to young people joining music groups isn’t repertoire, or classical music being perceived as ‘stuffy’, or the age profile of the group.

How to engage under-35s: Retention

This is the second set of recommendations drawn up following our research into young people’s attitudes towards making music. It follows on from the resource entitled How to engage under-35s: Recruitment.

How to engage under-35s: Recruitment

This is the first set of recommendations drawn up following our research into young people’s attitudes towards making music, and is written primarily for performing groups. There is a second set of recommendations as part of this series entitled How to engage under-35s: Retention. A set of recommendations tailored to promoting groups will follow.

Running a committee, part one: responsibilities and roles

The majority of our member groups are run by a committee - a group of enthusiastic people who care about their group, want to see it thrive and are willing to take responsibility for making that happen. As well as enthusiasm, a committee position requires good organisational skills, a willingness to give up some spare time and the ability to co-operate with others. And like most things in life, being on a committee will very often give you a sense of achievement and fulfilment – but it can also be tedious and frustrating, especially when things are not going right.

Running a committee, part two: meetings, communication and ways of working

The majority of our member groups are run by a committee - a group of enthusiastic people who care about their group and are willing to take responsibility for running it. Even if you don’t have something formally called ‘a committee’ it is likely that you have a group of people who work together to run your group and so the overarching themes in this resource will still be relevant. 

Similarly whilst the resource refers to constitutions and charities, if your group is not a charity or does not have a constitution the main themes are still applicable.

Running a committee, part three: recruitment and problem solving

The majority of our member groups are run by a committee - a group of enthusiastic people who care about their group and are willing to take responsibility for running it. Even if you don’t have something formally called ‘a committee’ it is likely that you have a group of people who work together to run your group and so the overarching themes in this resource will still be relevant.  Similarly whilst the resource refers to constitutions and charities, if your group is not a charity or does not have a constitution the main themes are still applicable.

Searching for a Music Director

Need to find a new Music Director? This guidance has some top tips to help you through the process.