Working with young people

Youth engagement resources

Many music groups tell us they find it challenging to attract younger members. With the help of a generous legacy from lifelong choral singer Pauline Thompson, we have been able to compile a bank of resources aimed at helping you to reach out to under-35 year olds.

We'll continue to add to these resources, but in the meantime if you think we're missing something that would be helpful for groups like yours, or if you have any questions,  just get in touch

Safeguarding

When it comes to a broad topic like safeguarding it can be difficult to know where to start. To help we've produced a range of resources (including a template policy) and can help arrange DBS checks for you. We'll continue to add to these, but in the meantime if you think we're missing something that would be helpful for groups like yours, do please let us know.

Working with Music Education Hubs

There is a well documented drop off in young people’s involvement in music making aged 18 when they leave the formal education system. Collaborations with Music Education Hubs could be one way to prevent some of this drop off.

How to find new young members and audiences as an Arts Award Supporter

Arts Award is a range of qualifications provided by Trinity College that supports anyone aged up to 25 to grow as artists and arts leaders, inspiring them to connect with and take part in the wider arts world. This resource looks at why this could be a useful scheme for Making Music members to know about, and how to best interact with it as an Arts Award Supporter.

Recruiting young members: where to find them!

Our research into engaging under 35 year olds in music groups pointed to a need for better outreach and publicity. Young people might not be specifically looking for a group to join, or might not be aware of groups in their area. So instead of waiting for them to find you, go to where they are! But where might they be? Here are a few ideas to get you started.

1. Go to local businesses and offices

Most offices will have a fair number of under 35s amongst their staff. Try the following:

Group Policies: What do you need to have?

Polices aren’t necessarily the most exciting thing to think about when you’re running a music group. But they are important and will help you run your group more efficiently and effectively. We have provided a list of the most common polices you might consider having, together with links to further resources and some template documents. But first, a quick word on why you should have polices in place.

A policy sets out your commitment to a particular area. This can:

Safeguarding Policy template

We have developed a template Safeguarding policy for use by our member groups, consisting of the policy itself and some guidance notes to help you adapt it appropriately.

It is designed to be a starting point for you policy and can be adapted to suit your group’s circumstances. As well as the accompanying notes, we recommend you read our general Safeguarding guidance

How to engage under-35s: Retention

This is the second set of recommendations drawn up following our research into young people’s attitudes towards making music. It follows on from the resource entitled How to engage under-35s: Recruitment.

How to engage under-35s: Recruitment

This is the first set of recommendations drawn up following our research into young people’s attitudes towards making music, and is written primarily for performing groups. There is a second set of recommendations as part of this series entitled How to engage under-35s: Retention. A set of recommendations tailored to promoting groups will follow.

Survey Results: Young People and Participation in Amateur Music Groups

Research published today by Making Music sheds new light on the obstacles amateur music groups face when attracting younger members.