Guidance

An introduction to: Barbershop

At Making Music we're having a look at some of the music that our members make, and we've decided to begin with Barbershop. What makes this genre so unique? Why is it so easy for Barbershop singers to get hooked on this music? And what's this about 'singing polecats'?

Tips for designing a website for your group, part 3: Visibility

In the final part of our three-part guide on creating a website, we'll cover ways to increase the visibility of your website to bring in more visitors; something worth thinking about before you start to build your site, as well as when you're looking to make ongoing improvements to it in the future.

We'll start by looking at how to make sure your pages are appealing to search engines, move on to using social media and inbound links, then cover how you can apply for free advertising from Google and finally look at ways to monitor your progress.

Tips for designing a website for your group, part 2: Design and copy

Now that you've worked out what you and your users both need on your website (see part 1), you're ready to move on to what it might look like and how you might display your content to users. Whether you're creating it from scratch, choosing a ready-made template or paying a professional, these tips will help you evaluate your design options and make your site as effective as possible.

Tips for designing a website for your group, part 1: Planning

We know that designing, or redesigning, a website can be a scary task. But with time, some thought and a bit of creativity, almost anyone can produce a good website. If you can use Word or Facebook or Google, you can do this too!

In part one of our three-part guide on creating a website, we'll cover the important bit that often gets left out: planning!

Top 5 tips for designing posters

A poster isn’t just for showing the details of an event (often it isn’t even mostly for showing the details of an event): it’s for enticing people into wanting to go.

How to update your group contacts

This guidance will explain how to manage your group contacts through the Dashboard area on our website, including inviting new people and setting website permissions.

How to update your contact details

This guide explains how to update your personal contact details and mailing preferences through the ‘My Dashboard’ area of our website.

 

My Dashboard’ is your main admin area of the site – it is where you can view, add and update details about you and your group.

Running a committee, part one: responsibilities and roles

The majority of our member groups are run by a committee - a group of enthusiastic people who care about their group, want to see it thrive and are willing to take responsibility for making that happen. As well as enthusiasm, a committee position requires good organisational skills, a willingness to give up some spare time and the ability to co-operate with others. And like most things in life, being on a committee will very often give you a sense of achievement and fulfilment – but it can also be tedious and frustrating, especially when things are not going right.

Running a committee, part two: meetings, communication and ways of working

The majority of our member groups are run by a committee - a group of enthusiastic people who care about their group and are willing to take responsibility for running it. Even if you don’t have something formally called ‘a committee’ it is likely that you have a group of people who work together to run your group and so the overarching themes in this resource will still be relevant. 

Similarly whilst the resource refers to constitutions and charities, if your group is not a charity or does not have a constitution the main themes are still applicable.

Running a committee, part three: recruitment and problem solving

The majority of our member groups are run by a committee - a group of enthusiastic people who care about their group and are willing to take responsibility for running it. Even if you don’t have something formally called ‘a committee’ it is likely that you have a group of people who work together to run your group and so the overarching themes in this resource will still be relevant.  Similarly whilst the resource refers to constitutions and charities, if your group is not a charity or does not have a constitution the main themes are still applicable.